Manager and Chairman of the Board

 

 

Lumber department species of the month ..... African zebrawood

 

Characteristics......

 

Color: The sapwood is normally whitish in color, whereas the hardwood is a light golden yellow or pale brown, with narrow darker streaks or veins that range from dark brown to near black. These give the wood the zebra – stripe pattern from which it gets its name.

 

The grain is typically interlocked or wavy, with a medium to coarse texture and a high luster. The interlock grain, which is alternatively hard and soft, can produce an attractive ribbon figure.

 

Properties....

 

Zebrawood is a hard, dense and heavy wood with high strength properties and very high stiffness. It is not suitable for steam bending. It works well with hand tools and most machining operations. Planing can be tricky, since interlocked grain can tear badly, so sanding is advised for a final finish.

 

The wood routs, boars, moulds and mortises well and gluing is satisfactory if care is taken. Pre-boring is advised for nailing and screwing. If a clear filler is used, the wood can be brought to an excellent polished finish.

 

Durability.....

 

The hardwood is not durable and is subject to insect attack; it is resistant to preservative treatment, but the sapwood is permeable.

 

Origin....

 

West Africa, particularly Cameroon, Congo and Gabon

 

Common uses....

 

The principal use of zebrawood is a decorative veneer, which is usually sliced from quarter sawn stock to minimize buckling. This is used in cabinet work as inlay, cross bandings, and paneling

 

The wood is also used for furniture, decorative turnery, sculpture brush backs, handles, boat building and decorative plywood.

 

Availability....

 

none in stock, it appears that zebrawood is not in “season”. When available it cost about $10 a board foot and comes in variable widths 8 to 12 inches and 4/4 S3S